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What Causes Mortons Neuroma

Overview

interdigital neuromaMorton's neuroma is a painful condition that affects the ball of your foot, most commonly the area between your third and fourth toes. Morton's neuroma may feel as if you are standing on a pebble in your shoe or on a fold in your sock. Morton's neuroma involves a thickening of the tissue around one of the nerves leading to your toes. This can cause a sharp, burning pain in the ball of your foot. Your toes also may sting, burn or feel numb. High-heeled shoes have been linked to the development of Morton's neuroma. Many people experience relief by switching to lower heeled shoes with wider toe boxes. Sometimes corticosteroid injections or surgery may be necessary.

Causes

Anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve can lead to the development of a neuroma. One of the most common causes comes from wearing shoes that have a tapered toe box, or high-heeled shoes that cause the toes to be forced into the toe box and overload pressure onto the forefoot. An injury or trauma to the forefoot may also lead to a neuroma. People at a higher risk of developing a Neuroma include people with certain foot deformities, such as bunions or hammertoes. Certain foot types, such as flat feet (Pronation) More flexible feet, and woman after pregnancy.

Symptoms

The symptoms of Morton?s Neuroma tend to come and go over time. They are typically exacerbated by physical activity or by wearing certain shoes. Morton?s Neuroma symptoms include sharp pain in the ball of the foot, pain radiating to the tips of the toes, burning pain in the second, third, or fourth toes, numbness in the toes, sensation of a lump between the toes.

Diagnosis

Your podiatric physician will begin by taking a history of your problem. Assist him or her by describing your condition as well as you can. Keep track of when the symptoms started and how, any changes you?ve noted (whether the pain has gotten worse, or whether other symptoms have appeared as well, etc.). If you?ve noticed that certain activities or footwear make things worse or bring about additional symptoms, be sure to mention that. If you work in specific footwear, or if you participate in any certain sports, bring the shoes you use. Your doctor may be able to learn quite a lot about your condition that way!

Non Surgical Treatment

If your Morton's neuroma is painful, your doctor usually will begin treatment with conservative therapies, including a switch to shoes with low heels, wide toes and good arch support. Padding techniques, including metatarsal pads or toe crest pads. Shoe inserts (orthotics) to help correct any mechanical imbalance in the foot. Anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin and other brand names) or naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn and other brand names) A local injection of anesthetic and corticosteroid medication into the affected area. Inflamed or injured nerves can take months to improve, even after the underlying problem has been corrected.Morton

Surgical Treatment

Majority of publications including peer review journal articles, surgical technique description and textbooks promote surgical excision as a gold standard treatment. Surgical excision is described as the most definitive mode of treatment for symptomatic Morton?s neuroma with reported success rates varying between 79% and 93%. Various surgical techniques are described, essentially categorised as dorsal versus plantar incision approaches. Beyond this the commonest technical variation described as influencing the outcome of surgery involves burying and anchoring transacted nerve into soft tissue such as muscle.
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